Three Anime You May Have Never Heard Of (But Should Be Watching)

Note:  All three anime can be found on Netflix Instant Stream.

Sgt. Frog is about these alien frogs sent to Earth in order to capture it and enslave the humans.  Originally they’re separated, and they realize it’s not such an easy job.  Also, they grow attached to the humans that find them, along with the luxuries of fast food, television, and Gundam model kits.

This is a series almost appropriate for all ages.  There is no swearing, no blood and realistic violence (just basic cartoon humor), but there is a continuous use of guns, which is why I say almost appropriate.  Once children have a clear understanding that guns are not to be messed around, as they obviously can injure and kill living beings with them, then they can probably watch this show.

I’ve heard of the series but never watched it until a week ago, and I was pleasantly surprised.   It’s very cute, the characters are memorable and diverse, and the plots for the episodes are fun.

Hetalia:  Axis Powers is probably one of the most popular anime for anime fans, but it comes with some controversy.  The series is an anthropomorphism of countries during World Wars I and II, which has led to criticism; it neglects any mention of massacre, deep depression, and struggle that many countries went through during that time, and instead makes it a light-hearted show that has nothing to do with the wars, so why set it during this period?

Well, I can understand why this is in poor taste, especially as a Japanese-made show, as the country is notorious to try to erase or lessen its involvement in the textbooks.  On the other hand, this is based on the countries, not the leaders (and it’s very a stereotypical portrayal).  In able to enjoy the show, you have to remember that, because otherwise you’re going to feel very insulted.

The episodes are ridiculously short- five minutes, and that includes the opening and ending segments, so technically it’s three minutes.  There are two seasons, with each having twenty-six episodes, so you can easily watch all of it in four hours.

So why am I recommending it?  Well, if you take it with a grain of salt, it’s actually pretty good.  There is a bunch of actual historical references, like the Roman Empire (as pictured above), Germania, Prussia, and a bunch of smaller countries we don’t learn about in our typical history classes.  I actually learned some things while watching this show.

Princess Tutu is one of the best underrated anime series, in my opinion.  It’s very Swan Lake with the plot- our heroine is a duck who wears a jewel that allows her to be a normal girl (appropriately named Duck).   She then can transform into Princess Tutu, in order to gather pieces of her crush’s, Mytho’s, heart.  However, two people oppose her doing this, for different reasons- his best friend and guardian, Fakir, because he doesn’t his friend become heartbroken again, and Rue, his girlfriend, because of her fear he would leave her.

At first glance, people will probably dismiss it because of its’ similarities to other magical girl-oriented anime, such as Sailor Moon, but it’s more ballet/classical oriented than that.  The music is all famously classical, like Camille Saint Saens, Tchaikovsky, and others.  The anime has more of a rustic, European feel to it, as it takes place in Nördlingen, which is located in Germany.

This series is one of my all-time favorites.  I used to dance when I was younger, so yes I’m biased towards it, but the storyline is well-written and there are some nice twists that I did not expect when first watching it years ago.  I also related to the majority of the characters, because you can understand their opposition towards Princess Tutu- you might choose the same way if you were in their positions.

So that concludes ‘The Three Anime You May Have Never Heard Of (That You Should Be Watching)’.  Happy viewing!

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